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“An Edict of the Khan”: Two Narratives of the Mongols

A discussion of how to teach multiple interpretations of the Mongols

Bram Hubbell
Bram Hubbell
3 min read
“An Edict of the Khan”: Two Narratives of the Mongols

Like most empires in history, the Mongol Empire can be interpreted differently. The Mongols were terrible if one’s society was the victim of a Mongol conquest. If one benefitted from trade routes protected by the Mongols, the Mongols were a force for good. We want to help students understand how our understanding of the Mongols has changed over time.

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