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“There is One God”: Teaching Sikhism and Syncretism

A discussion of how to teach the Hindu and Islamic influences on Sikhism.

Bram Hubbell
Bram Hubbell
3 min read
“There is One God”: Teaching Sikhism and Syncretism
An illuminated Guru Granth Sahib. Source: Wikipedia.
From page 71 of the AP World History Course and Exam Description
From page 71 of the AP World History Course and Exam Description

During the early modern period, many major religious developments reflected the increased interconnectedness of the period. Whether it was religious conflict linked to expanding states, such as the tensions between Sunnis and Shi’as related to the Ottoman and Safavid rivalry, or the spread of Islam among states in Southeast Asia, such as the Aceh Sultanate. It can be tricky to teach these developments within their proper historical context, especially when it comes to a religious tradition many of our students had never heard of: Sikhism


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