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Visualizing the Continuity of Asian Trade Networks in Sixteenth-Century Japanese Nanban Screens

Discussion of Japanese nanban screens and teaching continuity in the sixteenth-century Indian Ocean.

Bram Hubbell
Bram Hubbell
3 min read
Visualizing the Continuity of Asian Trade Networks in Sixteenth-Century Japanese Nanban Screens
From page 84 of the AP World History Course and Exam Description
From page 84 of the AP World History Course and Exam Description

When we teach about the arrival of Europeans in the Indian Ocean in the sixteenth century, it’s easy to get caught up in how Europeans changed exchange patterns. The reality is that most economic, cultural, and political patterns stayed the same, but how do we show students continuities?

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