Skip to content

A Wealth of Haitian Revolution Resources

Discussion of recently published resources for teaching the Haitian Revolution

Bram Hubbell
Bram Hubbell
4 min read
A Wealth of Haitian Revolution Resources
Monument to the Battles of Vertières. Source: Faces of Haiti.

One of the joys of teaching world history for over twenty years was seeing how we teach topics change. When I began teaching, I felt compelled to include the same topics I had studied in Western Civilization courses and relevant world history topics. I remember struggling with how to fit in topics such as the Wars of the Three Kingdoms (what we used to call the English Civil War) alongside contemporary major land-based empires, such as the Ming Dynasty and the Ottomans. Over time, textbooks included less information about legacy European topics and more about events in the rest of the world.

In my first post on the Haitian Revolution, I discussed how that revolution became the topic I devoted the most class time to. During a month of posts, I highlighted many recently published books, articles, websites, and videos that could help teachers and students better understand why the Haitian Revolution was one of the most, if not the most, radical events in world history. In this post, I will discuss some recently published resources on the Haitian Revolution.

Mapping the Revolution


Related Posts

Members Public

“Nuclear Free and Independent Pacific”: Teaching Decolonization and the Cold War in the Pacific

Discussion of teaching decolonization in Oceania

“Nuclear Free and Independent Pacific”: Teaching Decolonization and the Cold War in the Pacific
Members Public

“I Will Shoot the Lions”: Nur Jahan and Mughal Women

Discussion of teaching the influence of Nur Jahan

“I Will Shoot the Lions”: Nur Jahan and Mughal Women
Members Public

“Improve the Quality of Life of the Majority of Its People”: Integrating Indigenous Perspectives in the Teaching of Guatemala and the Cold War

Discussion of how to integrate Indigenous experiences into teaching the Cold War

“Improve the Quality of Life of the Majority of Its People”: Integrating Indigenous Perspectives in the Teaching of Guatemala and the Cold War