Skip to content

Latin America

Members Public

“Men so Heartless”: Historical Imagination and Potosí

A discussion of teaching the silver trade to understand the effects on Indigenous Americans better.

“Men so Heartless”: Historical Imagination and Potosí
Members Public

"People Who Have Interrupted Empire": African and Indigenous Resistance in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries

I’ve looked at more world history textbooks than I want to admit. One thing almost all of them have in common is some discussion of Portuguese maritime expansion along the western coast of Africa in the fifteenth century and the Spanish and Portuguese conquest of the Americas in the

"People Who Have Interrupted Empire": African and Indigenous Resistance in the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Centuries
Members Public

Revolutionary Revolutions: Rethinking how we teach the political revolutions between 1750 and 1900

Dear #APworld teachers, if you want a fresh, global approach to teaching revolutions, come check out our #whapchat discussion this week led by @ERBeckman and @bramhubbell - I know I’m spending some time this weekend revamping my lessons! #sschat #worldhistory #historyteacher https://t.co/Av5nMPkyfp — Angela A. Lee (@mrshistorylee)

Revolutionary Revolutions: Rethinking how we teach the political revolutions between 1750 and 1900
Members Public

A Revolutionary Challenge: The Túpac Amaru Rebellion and Rethinking the Atlantic Revolutions

In many world history textbooks, discussion of the Atlantic Revolutions often begins with the background causes, such as the Seven Years’ War and the Enlightenment, that contributed to the outbreak of the Revolutions, and the first revolution discussed is almost always the North American Revolution. While it makes sense to

A Revolutionary Challenge: The Túpac Amaru Rebellion and Rethinking the Atlantic Revolutions